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Black History Month

Songs of the Movement

Rutha Mae Harris, SNCC Freedom Singer

Rutha Mae Harris, SNCC Freedom Singer

A retired teacher who lives in Albany, Georgia, Rutha Mae Harris joined the Albany Movement and the Original Freedom Singers in 1961, traveling more than 50,000 miles singing for the cause of freedom and raising funds for The Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. Along with Dr. King, she was jailed four times during the Albany, Georgia Movement in 1961-62.
Miss Harris' professional career began in 1963 when the Freedom Singers were signed to a recording contract with Mercury Records. She has also recorded with the Landmark Gospel Singers, Georgia Mass Choir and Whitney Houston and the Georgia Mass Choir. She has performed in 46 states, the Virgin Islands, Carnegie Hall, Radio City Music Hall, the Civic Opera House in Chicago, Illinois, The United Nations in New York, The Newport Jazz Festival in Rhode Island, the March on Washington in Washington, D.C., and the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. The Bahamas.

Event details

Tuesday, Feb. 4
6:30-8:00 p.m.
ITC room 120
2902 Edward Babe Gomez Avenue
Omaha NE 68107

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Questions? Contact bvelazquez@mccneb.edu or 531-MCC-2253 for more information.

Black Church Food Security Network

Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, III, Senior Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church

rEV. DR. HEBER BROWN, III

Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, III, Senior Pastor of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church, Baltimore, Maryland and the Black Church Food Security Network combat food apartheid by helping historic African American congregations establish or expand gardens (or agricultural projects) on church-owned land. The Network also links Black Churches and Black Farmers in a joint effort to create a community-controlled, alternative food system based on food and land sovereignty. Rev. Dr. Brown III is a recipient of the Ella Baker Freedom Fighter Award, the Afro American Newspaper’s “25 Under 40 Emerging Black History Leaders” award, praise from Urbanite Magazine as one of the “Change Makers of Baltimore City, " a $10,000 Fellowship Award from The Beatitudes Society as one of eight leading young progressive Faith leaders in the country, grist.org’s one of "The 50 People You'll Be Talking About This Year," Baltimore Magazine’s Visionary of the City, Baltimore City Office of Civil Rights’ Food Justice Award and the Claneil Foundation’s Emerging Leaders Award.

Event Details

Tuesday, Feb. 11
6:30-8 p.m.
Fort Omaha Campus
Swanson Conference Center, Building 22, room 201
5300 N 30th Street
Omaha NE 68111

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Questions? Contact bvelazquez@mccneb.edu or 531-MCC-2253 for more information

Video Series & Discussion: Reconstruction: America After the Civil War

Reconstruction America After the Civil War poster image

Film discussions led by Arvin Frazier III, Executive Director, College Possible

Participants who attend 75% of the segments will receive a special gift.

Part 1: The aftermath of the Civil War was bewildering, exhilarating...and terrifying. African Americans had played a crucial role in saving the Union and now, as the country grappled with the terms and implications of Reconstruction, they struggled to breathe life into their hard-won freedom. The result was a second American Revolution.

Part 1
Tuesday, February 11
South Omaha Campus
10:30-11:45 a.m.
ITC 120
2902 Edward Babe Gomez Avenue
Omaha NE 68107

Part 2: Post-Civil War America was a new world. Reconstruction was what historian W. E. B. Du Bois once described as African Americans’ “brief moment in the sun.” Support for the social, economic, and political gains they achieved didn’t last long. A controversial presidential election in 1876 deals Reconstruction a grievous blow, Southern states are “redeemed” and the forces of white supremacy are ascendant.

Part 2
Wednesday, February 12
Fort Omaha Campus
2:30-3:45 p.m.
Bldg 10, Room 110
5300 N 30th Street
Omaha NE 68111

Part 3: From 1877-1896, visions of a “New South” set the stage for the rise of Jim Crow and the undermining of Reconstruction’s legal and political legacy. Some African Americans attempted to migrate, but the vast majority remained in the South, where sharecropping, convict leasing, disfranchisement, and lynchings limited opportunities and destroyed lives. African Americans refused to retreat and used their voices and pens to continue to fight for rights afforded to white Americans.

Part 3
Thursday, February 13
Elkhorn Valley Campus
6:30-8:00 p.m.
Room 114
829 N. 204th St.
Elkhorn, NE 68022

Part 4: The turn of the century is known as the ‘nadir’ of race relations: white supremacy was ascendant and African Americans faced both physical and psychological oppression. Racist imagery saturated popular culture and Southern propaganda manipulated the story of the Civil War and Reconstruction. But African Americans found ways to fight back, using artistic expression to put forward a “New Negro” for a new century.

Part 4
Tuesday, February 18
Fort Omaha Campus
2:30-3:45 p.m.
Bldg 10, Room 110
5300 N 30th Street
Omaha NE 68111
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Questions? Contact bvelazquez@mccneb.edu or 531-MCC-2253 for more information

Idlewild: The Rise, Decline and Rebirth of a Unique African American Resort Town

Idlewild, The rise, decline and rebirth of a unique African American resort town

by Dr. Ronald J Stephens

In 1912, white land developers founded Idlewild, an African American resort community in western Michigan. Over the following decades, the town became one of the country’s foremost vacation destinations for the Black middle class, during its peak drawing tens of thousands of visitors annually and hosting the era’s premier entertainers, such as the Four Tops, Della Reese, Brook Benton and George Kirby. By the early 1980s, the town had become a struggling retirement community in the midst of financial and political crises.

Event details

Wednesday, Feb. 12
10:30-11:45 a.m.
South Omaha Campus
ITC Conference Center, room 120
2902 Edward Babe Gomez Avenue
Omaha NE 68107

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Questions? Contact bvelazquez@mccneb.edu or 531-MCC-2253 for more information

Economic Inequality & the Return of Jim Crow

Devin Fergus, Ph.D. presenter for Black History month

Devin Fergus, Ph.D., Strickland Distinguished Professor of History & Black Studies, Affiliated Faculty of the Truman School of Public Affairs, University of Missouri

In recent decades financial deregulation has led to a growth of hidden fees and charges that adversely impinge on the American consumer. The consequent rise in economic inequality has disproportionately affected the Black and Latino part of the U.S. public, possibly precipitating a new crisis of democracy. From a historical perspective, the crisis is not only American but global, and echoes the Cold War and Jim Crow years of a racially segregated nation.

Event details

Thursday, Feb. 20
12:30-1:45 p.m.
Elkhorn Valley Campus
Room 114
829 N. 204th St.
Elkhorn, NE 68022

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Questions? Contact bvelazquez@mccneb.edu or 531-MCC-2253 for more information